Tag Archives: hull build

Fit-out and Steelwork

Fitout

The current process is trying to finalise the major items in the fit-out of the boat, so that I can install the major structural elements for the cabin and mast. This is a bit of a “round in circles” process, You imagine how it will be, draw it out, see it doesn’t fit, imagine it again etc. Clearly some items will fall out later in the process, but we do need to get the mast, boiler, engine in the right place and make sure that one is not sharing the loo (head) with the other members of the crew or a few hundredweight of hot steel! Continue reading

Mast Partners and Step – CAD/CAM

As noted in the last post, the plans for the cabin/mast arrived from Selway Fisher. Having poured/poored/pawed?? over these for a few weeks we have concluded we are going to slightly modify the proposed arrangement by installing a set of steel bracing inside the boat to support the Mast Partners (the thing the mast hinges in when being trailered), so that we can reclaim a little more internal space. We understand this is another bitter pill for the wooden boat druids to swallow, but hey, this is the 21st Century! Continue reading

More nautical terminology wierdness

A bit of light (well heavy actually) relief

The last few weeks have been devoted to progressing the Landrover rebuild to provide a comfortable and reliable tow vehicle, vast amounts of foam insulation, lead-loaded sound deadening and carpet and new LED lights might make it quieter, but I suspect may have more effect on the fuel consumption! But with some of the new doors fitted onto the new chassis it’s starting to look like we might get there! Personally, I rather like the UN-style paint job (the doors came from different places and the new bulkhead was second hand) with a combination of white and black doors metallic blue bulkhead and the original (if faded) blue and white Landy paint job. As an alternate I fancy respraying the whole thing in “ASBO” orange, but there are descenting voices in the camp! Continue reading

Turning it over!!!!!

Well, yesterday was a momentous day! As noted in the previous post, I was totally ready to move on and stop filling/preparing the hull and see the inside!

More assistance from Nigel Thomson from the SBA produced an excellent result.

We propped the workshop roof with some Acroprops, fitted up a selection of chain hoists (thank you Graham for loaning yours) and supported the boat in slings. We then got inside and removed a remarkable quantity of ironmongery and stripped out all the molds…. Thank you Nigel for doing the majority of this work! Continue reading

Painting and Filling

Well actually this short post just concerns itself with filling… Having sanded off the epoxy cladding, the next step was to fill it to provide a flat surface for painting. I was advised to use Nautix Blue Epoxy filler, which I obtained from MarineWare in Fareham. This is quite remarkable stuff – it’s expensive at £100 for 10litres, but it is VERY fine, a joy to apply and very economic. In fact I used less than 10 litres to process the entire boat. I owe a deal of thanks to Tommy Robinson an old friend and professional decorator for showing me how to apply the filler – the finish we achieved before sanding was quite amazing… Continue reading

Deadwood – dead hard! (pt. #2)

Too much moaning!

Well it’s another month down the road and the deadwood/keel is done – to be fair to Selway Fisher most of my troubles with this are entirely self inflicted, and by comparison to some other designs, Paul’s are much simpler and well thought out for the beginner (and in fact the first sentence of the instructions for the Golden Bay say that it’s not designed for the first time builder, so the fact I am almost ready to turn over the hull is a tribute to his design!).

Keel Bolts and Drilling

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DeadWood – dead hard! (pt. #1)

The Keel?

So the next step in the process is to add what you or I might call “the keel” (but the designer calls the “the deadwood“).

Half the deadwood in place

Half the deadwood in place

I imagined this would be an easy job, but it actually transpired to be quite taxing and turned into some nightmarish version of steel and wood Lego, where determining the exact order of events for the build bore dire consequences and was fraught with issues – I think we are nearly there now, but let this be a salutatory tail of the importance of obeying that #1 maker’s rule of  “measure twice and cut once!”. Continue reading

A hull with no holes in – oh wait!

Well this months thanks go to Nigel Thompson from the SBA who noticed signs of wavering and  procrastination in my questioning about the sequence of build operations, and stepped in to put me back on the right track….

To go back a bit; you might recall that the game plan is to clad the hull outside and in with epoxy/cloth skins. Also we need to add the “keel” (aka “deadwood”) to the bottom of the boat after cladding, and the question was do we clad the out side, then fit the keel/propshaft/rudder etc.  then turn her over and clad the inside? or do we clad the outside, turn her over and clad the inside then turn her over and fit the keel and then turn her a third time or some other combination of things…. In the middle of this agonising it was suggested by others that the internal and external cladding need to be done in one season to stop the timber “shrinking away from the cladding” due to changes of humidity in the (half-clad) timber…. and then there is a land-rover chassis sitting waiting to be mated to my winter transport and then there are holidays and bike tours in France and then…… At this point the aforementioned Nigel stepped in and said “common lets get moving I’ll come next week and help with the cladding”. and so it was to be….. Continue reading