Tag Archives: Condenser

Mid 2017 Update

Progress since April

Well, it seems like high time I provided an update, as the last one was in April!

At some level it feels like not much has been achieved, but that’s because a lot of the work has been “bitty”, finishing up jobs and tidying up items that had been hanging around for a while – and then there was the distraction of needing to design/build a new garden shed (the last one literally blew down – the joys of living 900ft up in the Pennines!).

So here is a list of the items I can recall completing….

  • Finishing the inner Boiler casing – next job is to “lag” the inside with ceramic board insulation
  • Making a manifold for the feed clacks – basically milling and turning off about 80% of a steel block.
  • Remaking the battery pack for the VHF transceiver – no replacements available.
  • Testing the antique Sailor VHF radio – (using the aforementioned transceiver)
  • Rebuilding and modifying the lubricator pump and plumbing to fix leaks – (correction; most leaks!)
  • Making a sump/oil tray for the engine – expensively made from spare 3mm brass sheet!!!
  • Repainting the condenser – maximum Nitromors, but looks better.
  • Finishing steam re-heater  – making unions, and lagging in “broken bone” plaster bandage.
  • Plumbing in the condenser steam and cooling water circuits – lots of cursing, custom unions and silver soldering.
  • Fixing the pump/alternator assembly to sump – decided the floating design was no good.
  • Craning the engine and boiler around ready for testing.
  • Spent a fine day on Grayling on Windermere – we all need a break sometimes!

Next Steps

  • I think the engine is now effectively ready to install into the boat, but we are going to bench test the whole shbang before we do this.
  • Strip the boiler casing and fit the insulation.
  • Mount inner and outer funnel onto boiler.
  • Screw cut the M20 and M16 stays for the boiler (thanks John for loan of larger lathe).
  • Make water gauge – modified castings arrived (thanks to Ian Cross for the pattern making).
  • Assemble and pressure test the boiler!!!!!!

I have assembled a slideshow of photos to record some of the above items, rather than post them all individually – enjoy!

 

Shiny Things

While we await the 600+ cut and bent boiler tubes from the other members of the “Boiler Collective” beavering away in Sussex, we went back to the engine to try and close off the final list of “to do” jobs….

Cleading/Lagging/Cladding

I think Cleading is the official word for this, even though WordPress objects!

This is installed around the cylinder block to try to keep the heat in, raise the temperature of the block and reduce power-sapping condensation in the cylinders. (A thin film of condensate on the cylinder walls can apparently eat up to about 50% of the input steam in small (2″) cylinders according to this paper).

While on the face of it the Leak’s cleading can be quite simple, it still took two days of paper templates and careful nibbling of the 40thou stainless sheet I chose to use. This is thicker than often used, but I had discovered in using the same material on the 5″ Nigel Gresley I built, that is produces a far more robust job, and is much less prone to kinks and dents.

This was layed over a sheet of Kaowool blanket (with extra layers stuffed into the spaces) and secured with 2BA screws (temp ones shown in pictures) and I was quite pleased with the overall job.

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Condenser Mounting

The mounting of the ancillaries onto the engine always seems to entail many hours of contemplation and procrastination (see next bit). On the Leak the condenser was not discussed in the original Model Engineer articles, and while the drawings are available the mounting is left to the builder’s discretion.

I opted not to undertake the building of the condenser. and instead managed to purchase a second-hand item (probably for a Stuart Turner 6A) from Simpson’s in Coniston at a very fair price. I eventually decided to build some large “shelf brackets” from some 3mm brass plate in the “stores”, and attached these to the flat faces on the rear of the bed and columns that were originally meant to hold the air/feed pump assemblies and cross-head guide. Having polished them with those fantastic York abrasive rubber blocks that Cromwell stock they looked quite posh!

The Condenser Shelf Brackets

The Condenser Shelf Brackets

Clearly the condenser itself still needs a coat of nice paint!

Displacement Activity

The next task is to find a place to mount the lubricator pump, and this engendered a lot of head scratching and eventually got diverted into some classic “displacement activity” (things you do to avoid doing the thing you need to do!).

So I polished the gauges I plan to use… more abrasive-block work and a nice result…

Shiny Gauge Set

Shiny Gauge Set

Onwards…..

Spring Progress & A Find

The clocks moved today, and the weather is amazing – must be close to 20c.

Last weekend Louise and I went to the AGM of the SteamBoat Association in Cleavdon (near Bristol) and had a really nice weekend – a very friendly and informed group of people. Also there was an auction (dangerous things auctions), but fortunately we forgot a cheque book, so I was unable to take advantage of many of the incredible bargains… 😉

However I did purchase the core of a condenser, which while quite large might make the basis of the one I need to build – 30lbs of Brass, and about 100 tubes for £10!!!

(pictures to follow!)