Tag Archives: sailing log

Friday 13th – unlucky for us, and performance data

Lady Luck

Took Befur out for a tour of the lake yesterday, enjoying a day of early autumn sunshine. Conscious that it was a fated day, I was expecting some drama!

Lou managed to (very narrowly) avoid a dunking while we were boarding, so I thought we might of escaped. However, bad planning on my part resulted in us getting blown onto a jetty on the lake, which was (unbeknown to us) fitted with large bolt ends projecting out to catch people in exactly our predicament – so more filling, sanding and re-painting required over the winter to repair a pair of gouges in the hull – bugger!

Performance Testing

One of my objectives for the trip, was to collect some performance data, and the map below (click the link and it should open in google maps) shows the route and the waypoints with speed, direction etc. (clicking on these will give performance data for each bit of the trip).

https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?hl=en&hl=en&mid=1qv-Q4JREXMB5lKKMXQmANtZhy-Hxu3DD&ll=54.607108645724125%2C-2.8355938095091915&z=16

The net of this experimentation produced data on two “stable modes” of operation.  All of this at a boiler pressure cycling between 185 psi and 225 psi.

For the record we are now operating with a gear-up ratio from engine to propeller of 1.45:1 and a 21″ x 19″, 3 bladed, left hand prop.

At “cruising speed”

At this speed we are operating with a HP pressure of 60-70 psi, and an LP pressure of around 16 psi and a vacuum of about 10-inches. The engine is turning at between 175 rpm and 125 rpm (when alternator is charging). The map tells us we are moving at about 3 mph (2.6 knts), it was running into fairly light winds, so this data seems realistic.

At “flank speed”

This is about as fast as I feel happy running the plant, and is resulting in the engine slightly outrunning the boiler with a sustained boiler pressure of about 170 psi.. HP pressure is 135 psi, LP pressure 28 psi, vacuum of 14-inches. The engine is turning at 300 rpm and the log tells us she is making between 6.5 to 7.2 mph.

…so with a computed hull speed of just under 8 mph we still have a way to go on the performance stakes.

Those with better maths than I might be able to turn this into some meaningful performance data for the engine hull.

We also had the time to check the depth sounder and it certainly seems to work, with the audible alarm providing some confidence for the helms-person when we are running out of water!

…onwards, it will be “dragging out” time in the next few weeks, and then we can fix the outstanding mechanical issues, ifx the knocks and bangs, fit the mast and figure out how to stop the water getting into the cabin roof!

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A new generation of steam boater?

Another nice day on the lake, recorded by Daughter Kathy and MadMut Marine GPS Navigation Android ap….

Click on the waypoints in on the track displayed by the link below to see performance data.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1N9g2cDMAglY-4f8moEgLVhBVe8uQd1I8&usp=sharing

As you can see we had 3 generations on this trip…Good Friday Trip

Time to take stock

Well, as we approach the end of the 2018 season, we have decided to fetch Befur back onto dry land a little earlier than planned. This is principally because I can’t tolerate the racket the machinery is making underway, and it seems cruel to run it further pending the noise turning into a real “issue”.

…and it floats level!

We did have a nice steam this week about 2 1/2 hrs round the northern reach of the lake in a “fresh” breeze.  We were towing the inflatable (still nervous about our reliability) and this very nearly became airborne as we opened Befur up into the headwind – she goes quite well. Continue reading

AFLOAT AT LAST! OMG!!

After six weeks solid nagging from Malcolm I have finally been persuaded to write about our experiences on the ‘competent crew’ course. Not sure that this will be of benefit to anybody, but hey – here goes.

Part 1

Arrived at the school at teatime on Sunday. Felt mostly nervous and this wasn’t eased any by being the only girl amongst a fairly motley selection of blokes. There was ‘hairy Malcolm’ who we all know and love! John, an older chap (well older than us anyway) who seemingly had lots of experience. Ian, a very organised ex military police person now working in the NHS and Duncan the skipper who looked very chilled dressed in beach bum/surfer dude/not yachty sailor type togs.

Following the formal paperwork we were all dispatched to load the boat with food, clothes and other important stuff. We were given a safety briefing, sleeping arrangements were made and we were off. Too scary for words!