Tag Archives: engine build

Mid 2017 Update

Progress since April

Well, it seems like high time I provided an update, as the last one was in April!

At some level it feels like not much has been achieved, but that’s because a lot of the work has been “bitty”, finishing up jobs and tidying up items that had been hanging around for a while – and then there was the distraction of needing to design/build a new garden shed (the last one literally blew down – the joys of living 900ft up in the Pennines!).

So here is a list of the items I can recall completing….

  • Finishing the inner Boiler casing – next job is to “lag” the inside with ceramic board insulation
  • Making a manifold for the feed clacks – basically milling and turning off about 80% of a steel block.
  • Remaking the battery pack for the VHF transceiver – no replacements available.
  • Testing the antique Sailor VHF radio – (using the aforementioned transceiver)
  • Rebuilding and modifying the lubricator pump and plumbing to fix leaks – (correction; most leaks!)
  • Making a sump/oil tray for the engine – expensively made from spare 3mm brass sheet!!!
  • Repainting the condenser – maximum Nitromors, but looks better.
  • Finishing steam re-heater  – making unions, and lagging in “broken bone” plaster bandage.
  • Plumbing in the condenser steam and cooling water circuits – lots of cursing, custom unions and silver soldering.
  • Fixing the pump/alternator assembly to sump – decided the floating design was no good.
  • Craning the engine and boiler around ready for testing.
  • Spent a fine day on Grayling on Windermere – we all need a break sometimes!

Next Steps

  • I think the engine is now effectively ready to install into the boat, but we are going to bench test the whole shbang before we do this.
  • Strip the boiler casing and fit the insulation.
  • Mount inner and outer funnel onto boiler.
  • Screw cut the M20 and M16 stays for the boiler (thanks John for loan of larger lathe).
  • Make water gauge – modified castings arrived (thanks to Ian Cross for the pattern making).
  • Assemble and pressure test the boiler!!!!!!

I have assembled a slideshow of photos to record some of the above items, rather than post them all individually – enjoy!

 

Shiny Things

While we await the 600+ cut and bent boiler tubes from the other members of the “Boiler Collective” beavering away in Sussex, we went back to the engine to try and close off the final list of “to do” jobs….

Cleading/Lagging/Cladding

I think Cleading is the official word for this, even though WordPress objects!

This is installed around the cylinder block to try to keep the heat in, raise the temperature of the block and reduce power-sapping condensation in the cylinders. (A thin film of condensate on the cylinder walls can apparently eat up to about 50% of the input steam in small (2″) cylinders according to this paper).

While on the face of it the Leak’s cleading can be quite simple, it still took two days of paper templates and careful nibbling of the 40thou stainless sheet I chose to use. This is thicker than often used, but I had discovered in using the same material on the 5″ Nigel Gresley I built, that is produces a far more robust job, and is much less prone to kinks and dents.

This was layed over a sheet of Kaowool blanket (with extra layers stuffed into the spaces) and secured with 2BA screws (temp ones shown in pictures) and I was quite pleased with the overall job.

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Condenser Mounting

The mounting of the ancillaries onto the engine always seems to entail many hours of contemplation and procrastination (see next bit). On the Leak the condenser was not discussed in the original Model Engineer articles, and while the drawings are available the mounting is left to the builder’s discretion.

I opted not to undertake the building of the condenser. and instead managed to purchase a second-hand item (probably for a Stuart Turner 6A) from Simpson’s in Coniston at a very fair price. I eventually decided to build some large “shelf brackets” from some 3mm brass plate in the “stores”, and attached these to the flat faces on the rear of the bed and columns that were originally meant to hold the air/feed pump assemblies and cross-head guide. Having polished them with those fantastic York abrasive rubber blocks that Cromwell stock they looked quite posh!

The Condenser Shelf Brackets

The Condenser Shelf Brackets

Clearly the condenser itself still needs a coat of nice paint!

Displacement Activity

The next task is to find a place to mount the lubricator pump, and this engendered a lot of head scratching and eventually got diverted into some classic “displacement activity” (things you do to avoid doing the thing you need to do!).

So I polished the gauges I plan to use… more abrasive-block work and a nice result…

Shiny Gauge Set

Shiny Gauge Set

Onwards…..

Relief Vales and Drain Cocks

An experiment – Steam Operated Combined Drains & Relief

Much earlier in the process I baulked at drilling the cylinder castings for the cylinder drain cocks because they looked hard to drill with out risking damage to some rather expensive castings. Moreover, previous experience with manual cylinder drain cocks on the loco had been poor (leaky, difficult linkages etc.) and on the steam launch most people seem to opt for 4 manually operated cocks which involves a deal of “faffing” in use. Continue reading

Drivetrain and Spline cutting

We have turned one eye to the business of the drive train and prop-shaft for Befur.

I have concluded that I am putting a CV joint in the drive train, to allow the engine to be mounted horizontally, and also going to use a toothed belt drive from the engine to the prop-shaft, so allow me to install the engine off-centre, and improve internal layout.

The “Drivetrain”

Continue reading

Retirement Beckons!

A change of pace and circumstance

Well it seems I have not posted since November and the arrival of Befur’s trailer. Since then a lot has happened (so Happy Xmas, and Happy New Year)… I have had the fortune to be made redundant, and have (with Louise’s kind support) agreed to turn that into retirement – so from the end of February there will be no more working interruptions, and as I am only “on call” now, progress should be faster. So with the shingles finally subsiding, and hopefully the last of the winter colds and the left shoulder starting to free up,  there can be no more excuses – so 2015 looks bright indeed 🙂 Continue reading

Setting the valve gear ….

Well as the videos below demonstrate we have the valve gear finished, and I managed to time it reasonably. There is some blowby on the HP, and that might need further investigation, but on the whole it’s OK.

I scratched my head a lot on how to set this gear, and while this might not be the “right way” and the setting is certainly not “perfect” – let me tell you how I did this….

Firstly we set the engine up so I could feed each cylinder from compressed air, with “ball-a-fix” valves to allow me to control the amount of flow, and which cylinder is fed. Also fitted a small pressure regulator to allow me to control the pressure fed to the engine.

This set up allowed me to turn the engine over by hand and feel when the air pressure was assisting or hindering this turning, and thereby determine if the gear was feeding the pressure at the right part of the stroke. Then one could simply say “is the gear ahead of the crank position?” (e.g. the air is being fed too soon, or cut off too soon), OR “is the gear behind the crank” (e.g. the air is being fed too late). It was then quite simple to slack off the allen screw locking the eccentric to the crank, use the key to hold the eccentric in place, and manually move the crank ahead or behind (forwards or backwards) to attempt to correct the error. I did this first in full-forward gear and then repeated the same process for the HP  cylinder, and then in full reverse (setting the relevant eccentrics).

Three or four iterations produced the results shown below…

Firstly running in (very) slow forwards

Secondly, a “video tour” providing a more detailed view of the various components?